Thursday, November 16, 2017

Preface to TANAH TUJUH ~ Close Encounters with the Temuan Mythos



AT THE OUTSET I wish to declare that I am not an anthropologist.
 
I am, however, deeply interested in mythology. What fascinates me about the mythic tradition is that it has proven to be an effective way of preserving important archetypal images and ideas for thousands of years, merely through oral transmission down the generations. Like nursery rhymes imbibed in early childhood, a myth once heard is never forgotten, even if a few minor details get added or subtracted along the way.
 
Nadi Empok & his wife Lumoh in 1994
In this respect I perceive myths as organic time capsules of the tribal superconscious. More precisely they are a semiotic time-travel device: “reality spores” designed to survive aeons of incomprehension or indifference, only to germinate anew as soon as favorable conditions occur. To bring the stories back to life, you only have to add the water of empathy, of emotive resonance. Of course, it helps greatly if you also have “genetic access” to the stories. For each story, like a life, has its own specific genealogy. But in the end, all stories can be traced to a single source - the Mother Lode of Stories - which I comprehend as the deep memory of the Earth herself.
     
MYTHOLOGY, folklore, and grandmothers' tales are by definition non-logical story forms, meaningless to the rational mind and subject to no “scientific proof.” Characters tend to appear and disappear without rhyme or reason, and their actions and reactions are generally an unfathomable mystery - until one adds the essential ingredient, subjectivity. The fact that “mystery” and “myth” both contain the key word my is highly instructive. One has to own them, take personal possession of these transpersonal, extra-dimensional truths, before they yield their secret kernel of meaning. More specifically, one has to incorporate the mythic system into one's vision quest, so that the sense of revelation which follows the sudden flash of insight becomes an intensely intimate experience. For whom does the bell toll, if not yourself?
 
Halus, Titit & Kusak in 1996
In attempting to piece together the few Temuan myth fragments that I chanced upon, I have had to apply a liberal amount of interpretative glue. It is certainly not my intention to present this as some sort of “definitive” Temuan gospel. The shreds of tribal lore that have survived, at least amongst the Temuan I know, are too tattered and incomplete to reconstitute into any meaningful whole - unless one matches them with myth fragments from other native traditions. But essentially I just want to share my own insights and opinions - and the exquisite tingle of quiet excitement that each discovery brought - with whomsoever may be interested.   
 
The gods and heroes of antiquity are, in truth, fragments of our own mystery, our own unfolding story in space and time. We need only take the initiative to reclaim them from the myopia of our throwaway consumer culture and the self-destructive forgetfulness of our times.



TANAH TUJUH ~ Close Encounters with the Temuan Mythos was published in 2007 by Silverfish Books. It's available in hard copy as well as digital format.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

A PAIR OF DOGS AND TWO SHINY DIMES (revisited)

How clever can you get? A pair o’ dogs is a paradox. Two shiny dimes is the Cockney way of saying “new paradigms.” So this is “paradox and new paradigms” time, folks!

Quantum physicists report that electrons are both particles and waves; even coined a word for this paradoxical condition – wavicles!

Electrons are fundamental to our everyday world. They swirl around the nuclei of our very atoms, generating currents as they flow as electricity, and pass through integrated circuitry to produce the bedazzling wonders of electronics.

Electrons are like people.

How so? Look at any big modern city from the air. The higher you go the more it resembles a microchip, but as you zoom back in, it transforms into one big printed circuit board with all these capacitors, resistors, diodes, and semiconductors sticking up like tiny erections: highrises, office complexes, shopping malls, stadiums, sprawling suburbs, road networks. All these cables, tubes, and colorful wires transporting electrons hither and thither, generating the humdrum hum of rush hour traffic.


The moment you make the connection between micro and macro, you begin to comprehend this modified and updated adage: “As within, so without.” The esoteric insights gained by magicians and quantum physicists DO apply to our everyday lives, and the sooner we get comfortable with paradox, the less rigid our mindsets become. I’ve never known anybody to suffer from an overly flexible mindset, but those who cling to rigid perspectives and beliefs certainly cause a great deal of suffering, especially to their own loved ones.

Take the classic EITHER/OR stance for example. When you hear some buffoon saying, “You’re EITHER with me, OR against me” – watch out! He or she is attempting to box you in, leave you with another Hobson’s choice – which is really no choice at all. In life, it’s never black OR white, there’s always an entire spectrum of grays in between – not to mention the possibility of spontaneous rainbows of vivid colors from which to choose!

The antidote to either/or is BOTH/AND. Most times it’s BOTH this AND that, not either/or. You can apply this to just about any situation. Take the hullabaloo surrounding the issue of “moral policing”: you hear arguments on both sides, some advocating strict control over what young people do for fun, and others defending the individual’s right to define his or her own concept of “morality.”

I personally LOATHE the very idea of allowing the State to dictate social behavior; but that doesn’t mean I like the idea of my own teenaged children frying their neural circuitry and thwarting their own potential with stupid-making drugs. So the real issue isn’t whether moral policing is okay or not okay – but, rather, why do we keep resorting to FORCE when attempting to deal with any situation? Who was it who said: “When you think like a hammer, every problem looks like a nail”?

I find it unfathomable that there are so many who actually believe they can change people’s behavior from outside - through coercion, intimidation, and threats. Sure, point a knife at someone’s throat and they’ll give you their money or do whatever you say – but when the State legitimizes the use of brute force, it reinforces the Criminal Element and compels it to retaliate even more brutally.

Most times there is really no solution required beyond looking hard into the mirror and acknowledging that we’ve not been giving our kids enough attention, affection, and appreciation – which is why they don’t enjoy hanging around the homestead. I’ve seen so many parents justify their workaholism by saying it’s all for their children’s sake; they want to accumulate as much as possible, so they can give their kids the best education money can buy, and so on. But what they’re overlooking is that every kid essentially wants their parents to love and befriend them – everything else follows from that; and “education” itself can easily be shown to be merely another profitable racket run by know-nothings who actually don’t give a hoot whether your kids can think for themselves, as long as they pay their tuition fees on time.

“It’s a competitive world,” I hear parents parrot, “and we want to equip our children with everything they need to compete successfully.” First of all, when you have even the slightest understanding of quantum mechanics and the concept of the superconscious plenum, you would know that this is indeed an “observer-created” universe. Which, in plain words, means we see what we believe – not the other way around!

In effect, if you BELIEVE the world is “competitive” you project around yourself a hostile, unfriendly environment... and then you pass that holographic hell to your children as a legacy. Now, if you LOVE your kids, WHY on earth would you want to inflict such a bleak scenario on them? After all, the “future” is really just a bunch of different scenarios we’re collectively scripting with our present beliefs and perceptions.

Disaster, catastrophe, eco-apocalypse, Armageddon, and the New World Order are only scenarios generated by the old paradigms of Darwinian survivalism and Malthusian not-enough-to-shareism. They have absolutely no basis in reality... despite what the Experts say.

To become an Expert you have to embrace and extol and perpetuate the old paradigms. However, by consciously opting to create entirely new paradigms wherein all life can blossom into greater joy, freedom, and limitless abundance – without doing so at the expense of any other lifeform – you are effectively bypassing all possibility of doomsday, futility, and despair. Ask yourself now, isn’t that something worth putting your energy into, rather than gossiping about other people’s sex life?


[Originally published in the June 2005 issue of VIDA! First posted 8 January 2007]

RELATIVITY IS NO THEORY (updated)

Almost everything is relative, isn’t it? Spent the better part of my life peeling off layers of middle-of-the-road, middle-class programming (my dad subscribed to Reader’s Digest and sometimes bought their mail-order compilations of bland music). Yup, I fancied myself some exotic species of Bohemian. But where I live now - in an Orang Asli resort village in the jungly heart of the peninsula – I’m certainly the most middle-class person around. How many other households here actually have peanut butter and toilet paper on their shopping lists? Indeed, nobody else in Pertak Village has even heard of a shopping list.

I take a measure of pride, though, in the fact that ours is perhaps one of three houses without a TV aerial. My daughter did offer me Astro once but I didn’t want to pay a monthly fee only to get high blood pressure from watching the Bulldog Broadcasting Corporation and the Crap News Network and the icky ooze of putrid commercials. No doubt if highspeed broadband ever comes to the wilds of Ulu Selangor and I can actually stream Netflix, I might just relent and get hooked up - or simply hooked. After all, I’ve already long relented on electronic word processing, the internet, cellular phones, emails and SMSes. In fact, I’m really quite impressed by digital tech.

In my early teens I thought my musical taste was pretty outré (that’s French for astonishing and bizarre). I was picking up records by Edgard Varèse, Conlon Nancarrow, Terry Riley, John Coltrane, and Sun Ra (pictured left). The Beatles made pop respectable for me, and I began to ease off on movie soundtrack albums and progressive jazz à la Dave Brubeck and Charlie Mingus after turning on, tuning in, and dropping out. When a brain-damaged sociopath stole my entire LP collection a few years ago, I figured it was high time I updated myself on the contemporary music scene. However, try as I might, I just couldn’t get into hip-hop, rap, or techno – and death metal made me wish entire sections of the human race would die horribly, especially those generating the noise. Another sign of maturity, I sighed, acknowledging my thinning top and thickening middle in the mirror. But the truth was, I now qualified as a mainstream musical conservative – not unlike that snooty classical music reviewer who once dismissed as “fluff” everything written after 1856.

Not long ago I ventured into a fashionable chill-out joint (more like a low-budget sauna it was) where the in-crowd let their hair down (and their deodorized sweat out) twitching to b&d (bass & drums) and brainless dj scratching and a whole slew of absolutely soulless post-industrial neo-existential yuppie punkfunk. Didn’t do a thing for me. Why can’t they play some really sexy Senegalese m’balax? Or some truly inspired millennial techno-rap like 1 Giant Leap? Could this possibly be the unfortunate result of being born in the 1980s and having to listen to the dumbest music in the history of the Universe? Or just a long-term side effect of chlorinating and fluoridating the water supply?

“De gustibus non est disputandum,” the goddamn Romans used to quip. Can you figure that out? That’s right. There’s no disputing taste. Perhaps not, if everything is relative after all. But I’m still convinced that after a couple of generations, humans who habitually ingest fast foods are bound to suffer acute tastebud damage.

I’ve often been accused of being an “intellectual.” Excuse me, that’s not at all an accurate description, even if I do have a penchant for polysyllables. But I now accept all labels, having learnt to peel them off before the glue dries. Now, the late dramaturge Krishen Jit - bless his huggable soul, may he relish his new job as Director of the Cosmic Theater of the Absurd – he was my definition of an intellectual. Somebody who can’t help conceptualizing reality. Yet, it sometimes occurs to me that if I had been living in China during the so-called Cultural Revolution, I’d probably have been frogmarched to a labor camp and forced to grow kumquats on stony ground, even though I don’t wear half-inch thick glasses (Look, Ma, no contacts either!).

One of my childhood heroes was the Russian-Armenian magician G.I. Gurdjieff (pictured right), who enjoyed calling humans “those two-legged, three-brained beings.” There were no microchips or computers in Gurdjieff’s day, and nobody had heard of nanotech, or he might have said “four-brained beings.” However, Gurdjieff pointed out that to be whole beings we must connect our thinking, feeling, and moving centers and keep them functioning in dynamic equilibrium. The thinking center is located in our brain and neural circuitry. The feeling center is our emotional core, the metaphorical heart, where we experience empathy and compassion. The moving center is combination of ego, libido, and animal instinct (the solar plexus, sacral, and root chakras, if you’re familiar with such concepts).

An overactive moving center makes us dangerously and mindlessly impulsive (shoot first, talk later). Isolating ourselves in the ivory tower of the thinking center makes us Hamlets, beard-stroking theoreticians. And being stuck in the feeling center makes us compulsive consumers of melodrama (condemned to Drama Minggu Ini week after week).

Yup, it’s all a question of relativity. And you have to go through a hellish amount of relativity - demonstrating Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle over and over again - before you arrive at that point of Absolute Certainty where latitude and longitude intersect. But, have no fear, we’ll all get there yet. Then, finally, we’ll be able to hang a sign on our front door that says: NO RELATIVES, ONLY ABSOLUTES!

[Originally published in the May 2005 issue of VIDA! First posted 8 January 2007]